Thursday, April 27, 2017

Sickle Cell Anemia under the Microscope

Sickle cell anemia is an inherited form of anemia. It is a condition in which there are not enough healthy red blood cells to carry adequate oxygen throughout the body.

Normally, red blood cells are flexible and round, moving easily through blood vessels. When a person has sickle cell anemia, the red blood cells become rigid and sticky and are shaped like sickles or crescent moons. These irregularly shaped cells can get stuck in small blood vessels, which can slow or block blood flow and oxygen to parts of the body.

Microscopy image of sickle cell anemia at 40x magnification.
Sickle Cell Anemia under the microscope at 40x.

Symptoms of sickle cell anemia include fatigue, episodes of pain (when blood cells are being blocked), swelling of hands and feet, delayed growth, and vision problems.

Microscope World image of sickle cell anemia under the microscope at 100x.
Sickle Cell Anemia under the microscope at 100x.

There is no cure for most people with sickle cell anemia. Bone marrow transplant or a stem cell transplant is the only potential treatment, but it is only used in children under age 16 because of the increased risk for older patients. Treatment for sickle cell anemia is usually aimed at avoiding crises, relieving symptoms and preventing complications.

These images are of sickle cell anemia cells that were captured under a lab microscope using a 5 megapixel microscopy camera.

Microscope World image of sickle cell anemia captured at 400x.
Sickle Cell Anemia under the microscope at 400x.

Learn more about sickle cell anemia here.

Contact Microscope World with questions regarding microscopes and microscopy cameras.

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

High School Binocular Microscope

The Richter Optica HS-2B is a versatile high school compound microscope. A few features make this microscope one of the most popular microscopes across high schools in the United States.
  • Binocular eyetubes are adjustable from 55-75mm with WF10x eyepieces.
  • 40x, 100x, 400x, 100x magnification.
  • Retractable 40x and 100x (oil) objective lenses avoid damage if moved into contact with the stage.
  • Frame provides easy carrying handle.
  • Cord is attached and not removable - no lost cables in classrooms or at home!
  • LED light is cool and provides long-lasting bulb.
  • Mechanical stage is attached and locked on.
  • Coarse and fine focusing allows for a crisp and clear image.
  • 100~240V allows for use in all countries.
  • Microscope is also available in pared down 400x magnification model, HS-2B-3
  • The HS-2D is a digital version of this microscope.
  • The HS-2-WiFi is a WiFi wireless version of the microscope where you can connect up to six tablets or smart phones.
Richter Optica HS-2B high school compound binocular microscope provides 1000x magnification.
Richter Optica HS-2B High School Binocular Compound Microscope

Richter Optica HS-2B binocular compound microscope.
Richter Optica HS-2B High School Binocular Compound Microscope

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Mouse Intestine under the Microscope

The images below of a mouse intestine were captured using a Lumenera Infinity 3-1 microscope camera. This is a cooled, CCD camera that is great for low-light situations or where a high dynamic range is required. This 1.4 megapixel camera is ideal for the following applications:
  • Fluorescent Microscopy
  • Green Fluorescent Protein Applications
  • Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization
  • DNA Analysis
  • Live Cell Imaging
  • Brightfield, Darkfield, DIC/Phase Contrast
  • Near IR Applications
  • Histology, Pathology and Cytology
  • Forensic Analysis
  • Semiconductor Inspection
  • Metallurgical Microscopy 
Mouse intestine under the microscope captured with Lumenera Infinity 3-1 CCD camera.
Mouse intestine captured with the Monochrome Infinity 3-1 microscopy camera.

Mouse intestine captured with the Color Infinity 3-1 microscopy camera.
Mouse intestine captured with the Color Infinity 3-1 microscopy camera.

Infinity 3-1 microscopy camera image of mouse intestine under the microscope using fluorescence.
Mouse intestine captured with the Color Infinity 3-1 microscopy camera.

Contact Microscope World for more information on microscopy cameras.

Friday, April 14, 2017

Hair Under the Microscope

Harald K. Andersen of Steinberg, Norway captured these images of hair under the microscope. The first image is of a single strand of hair captured through the microscope at 20x magnification. The hair was dyed for the project.

Hair captured under the microscope.
(C) Harald K. Andersen. Single strand of hair under the microscope.

In order to capture the next image Andersen stacked together 480 images using a software called Zerene Stacker.

Hair captured under the microscope.
(C) Harald K. Andersen. 480 stacked images of a single strand of hair under the microscope.

Andersen mentioned that the hardest part of the project was tying the knot in the hair! A big thanks for sharing the images with Microscope World!

Friday, April 7, 2017

Tonsils under the Microscope

The palatine tonsils are two lymphatic masses, located at the back of the throat on each side of the oral pharynx. The tonsils play a role in protecting the body against respiratory and gastrointestinal infections.

Each tonsil consists of a network of crypts (pits) that store cells used to fight infection. The tonsils contain B cells, a type of white blood cell that fights infections. They also produce antibodies against polio, streptococcal pneumonia, influenza, and numerous other infections. Antibodies are proteins that help the body identify and attack harmful invaders.

The tonsils also contain several types of T cells, which are white blood cells that destroy cells infected with viruses and help the body build immunity to infectious organisms.

The images below are cross sections of Palatine Tonsils that were captured using a biological lab microscope and a microscopy camera.

Microscopy image of tonsil under the microscope at 40x captured by Microscope World.
Palatine tonsil under the compound microscope at 40x.

Microscope World image of palatine tonsil cross section under the microscope at 100x.
Palatine tonsil under the compound microscope at 100x.

Microscope World image of palatine tonsil cs captured at 400x.
Palatine tonsil under the compound microscope at 400x.

Contact Microscope World with any questions about microscopy or capturing digital images under the microscope.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Worms found in Cows under the Microscope

Bunostomum phlebotomum is a species of worms (nematodes) that are found in the small intestine of calves. The worms are stout and measure 1-3cm in length. Young animals are most commonly affected and only several hundred worms can cause death. Adults often carry worms but do not show any symptoms.

Diarrhea is the primary symptom in the cows along with signs of anorexia, lethargy and weight loss. Hypoproteinaemia, anaemia and dehydration often occur. Skin involvement due to larvae penetration appears as lesions especially on the feet and limbs. Analysis of fecal samples under a microscope enables eggs to be found, or adult worms can be visualized in the small intestine when an autopsy is performed.

Veterinarians and ranchers can use Anthelmintics (antiparasitic drugs) for effective treatment of the infection. Preventative antiparasitic treatment may help prevent the disease as well as pasture management to avoid egg and larvae accumulation.

The image below is Bunostomum phlebotomum that was taken from a calf in Texas. Images were captured using a 3 megapixel microscopy camera on the U2 Lab Microscope.

Microscope World image of bunostomum phlebotomum under the microscope at 100x.
Bunostomum Phlebotomum (worm) taken from a cow's intestine, examined under the U2 Microscope at 100x.

Microscope World image of Bunostomum phlebotomum under the microscope at 400x.
Bunostomum Phlebotomum (worm) taken from a cow's intestine, examined under the U2 Microscope at 400x.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Museum Display Microscope

The museum demonstration high definition display microscope was designed for use in museum and art exhibits. The stereo microscope provides dual magnification of 10x and 30x, ideal for viewing archeological samples, botany samples, fossils and insects. The microscope is equipped with a high definition HD camera and a 12" HD monitor.

The high definition monitor can face any direction, providing some options for exhibit setup. If the monitor is facing away from the eyepieces the microscope can be set up allowing visitors to look through the eyepieces on one side of the exhibit, while on the other side guests can gather around the monitor and view the samples.

Alternatively, the museum microscope could be set up in an area where visitors don't have the ability to touch the microscope, but are still able to view the samples underneath the microscope.

The display microscope has top and bottom LED illumination. This light is a cool light and will not heat up or harm any living specimens. Each light has its own rheostat intensity control.

Museum display microscope with HD digital camera.
Museum Display HD Microscope

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Intestine under the Microscope

The Jejunum is the middle portion of the small intestine, connecting the duodenum and the ileum. It is partially responsible for absorbing nutrients into the bloodstream. It is lined with finger-like projections, that are called villi, that move nutrients, vitamins and minerals from the intestine into the bloodstream where they can be used by the entire body.

The images below were captured with the RB30 lab microscope using a high definition HD microscopy camera.

Microscope World image of the jejunum captured under the microscope at 40x.
Jejunum under the microscope at 40x.

Microscope World image of the small intestine captured at 100x under the microscope.
Jejunum under the microscope at 100x.

Microscope World image of the Jejunum (small intestine) under the microscope at 400x.
Jejunum under the microscope at 400x.

Contact Microscope World with questions about digital microscopy.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Images captured with HS2 High School Microscope

HS-2B Binocular Microscope
The Richter Optica HS2 is available as a monocular microscope (HS-2M) or as a binocular microscope (HS-2B). The microscope comes standard with 4x, 10x, and 40x Achromat objective lenses and an optional 100x lens is available on some models. This microscope is used most commonly in high schools.

The images below were all captured using the 40x achromat objective lens that comes on the HS-2 microscopes. A 3 megapixel microscope camera was used to capture the images.




Microscope World image of Tilia under the microscope at 400x.
2-Year Tilia captured at 400x with the HS2 High School Microscope

Microscope World image of monocot and dicot at 400x.
Monocot & Dicot captured at 400x with the HS2 High School Microscope

Microscope World image of plant cells captured at 400x magnification under a high school microscope.
Plant Cells captured at 400x with the HS2 High School Microscope

Contact Microscope World for more information on high school microscope options.

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Microscope Service

Microscope World provides microscope service and microscope maintenance in Southern California. With over 30 years of technical experience, your microscope will be in good hands whether you need routine maintenance or need a specific problem fixed. You rely on your microscope to perform on a daily basis and if a problem should arise Microscope World understands the number one priority is to get your instrument back up and functioning properly in a timely manner.

  • Parts available for most microscope brands.
  • Volume discounting.
  • Over 30 years of technical experience.
  • Access to parts that are no longer supported by manufacturers.
  • Certified instrument calibrations.
  • Factory trained technicians.
Learn more about Microscope World's microscope servicing here.

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Textile Exam Microscope for Methods AATCC 20 and 20A

The Association of Textile, Apparel, and Materials Professionals has standards that are required for different test methods. There are several test methods that require the use of a microscope for examining textiles.
  • Test Method AATCC 20 is a qualitative fiber analysis test.
  • Test Method AATCC 20A is a quantitative fiber analysis test.
Microscope World has a specific microscope that meets test method AATCC 20 and AATCC 20A standards for textile examination.

Textile Exam Micrsocope for Method AATCC 20 and AATCC 20A
Textile Exam Microscope
The AATCC 20 and AATCC 20A textile examination microscope includes the following:
  • Polarizer and Analyzer
  • Gypsum Full λ Wave Plate
  • Mica 1/4 λ Wave Plate
  • Infinity Corrected Optics
  • Stress Free Plan Achromat 4x, 10x, 40x, 60x Objective Lenses
  • High Definition Camera with Image Capture to SD Card
  • 12" HD Monitor that Connects to Camera
  • Mechanical Stage
Learn more about the AATCC 20 and AATCC 20A textile exam microscope here.

Monday, February 27, 2017

New National Optical D-ELS-1 Stereo Microscope

Microscope World is excited to announce the new National Optical D-ELS-1 stereo microscope with 10x, 20x and 40x magnification.

National Optical D-ELS-1 stereo microscope with 10x, 20x and 40x magnification from Microscope World.
National Optical D-ELS-1 Stereo Microscope

This stereo microscope has three magnifications of 10x, 20x and 40x at an attractive low price. Dual LED top and bottom illumination can be controlled by the rheostat for each light. The microscope was designed for rugged use with locked-on parts and a carrying handle.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Liver Under the Microscope

The liver is a large, meaty organ that sits on the right side of the belly, protected by the ribs. The liver weighs about three pounds and is reddish-brown in color. If you were to touch the liver it would feel rubbery.

There are two large sections that make up the liver: the right and left lobes. The gallbladder sits under the liver, along with parts of the pancreas and intestines. The liver and these organs work together to digest, absorb and process food.

The liver's primary job is to filter blood coming from the digestive tract, before passing it along to the rest of the body. The liver also detoxifies chemicals and metabolizes drugs. As it does so, the liver secretes bile that ends up back in the intestines. The liver also makes proteins that are important for blood clotting and other functions.

The images below are of a pig's liver and were captured under the RB30 biological microscope using the HDCAM4 high definition microscopy camera.

Microscope World image of a pig's liver under a biological microscope at 40x magnification.
Pig's Liver under the Microscope at 40x.

Microscope World image of a pig's liver captured under the microscope at 100x.
Pig's Liver under the Microscope at 100x.

Microscopy image of pig's liver captured by Microscope World at 400x magnification.
Pig's Liver under the Microscope at 400x.

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Machinist Tool Kits

Microscope World now offers seven machinist tool kits for a variety of tasks including basic inspection, student and apprentice tool kits, depth measurement and routine inspection. Each machinist tool kit is manufactured by Mitutoyo and comes in a mahogany case.

Mitutoyo 64PKA080B basic inspection tool kit from Microscope World.
Basic Inspection Tool Kit
  • 6" Steel Rule
  • Micrometer, Range 0-1"
  • Dial Caliper, Range 0-6"



Mitutoyo 64PKA073B Digital Lite Tool Kit from Microscope World
Digital Lite Tool Kit
  • 6" Steel Rule
  • MyCal Lite Digimatic Caliper 0-6" / 0-150mm
  • Micrometer Lite 0-1" / 0-25.4mm



Mitutoyo 64PKA068A Machinist Caliper and Micrometer Tool Kit from Microscope WorldMachinist Caliper and Micrometer Tool Kit
  • Outisde Micrometer, Range 0-1"
  • Dial Caliper, Range 0-6"
  • 6" Flexible Rule






Mitutoyo 64PKA076B digimatic tool kit from Microscope World.
Digimatic Tool Kit
  • Digimatic Micrometer, Range 0-1" / 0-25.4mm
  • Digimatic Caliper with Absolute Encoder, Range 0-6" / 0-150mm


Mitutoyo 64PKA069A student machinist tool kit from Microscope World.
Student & Machinist Apprentice Tool Kit
  • Outside Micrometer, Range 0-1"
  • 6" Full-Flexible Rule 
  • Test Indicator Set, Range 0.04"
  • Dial Caliper, Range 0-6"







Mitutoyo 64PKA070A depth measurement tool kit from Microscope World.
Depth Measurement Tool Kit
  • Outside Micrometer, Range 0-1"
  • Depth Micrometer with (6 pcs rods), Range 0-6"
  • Full Flexible Rule
  • Dial Caliper, Range 0-6"




Mitutoyo 64PKA071B routine inspection tool kit from Microscope World.
Routine Inspection Tool Kit
  • Outside Micrometer Set (3pcs), Range 0-3"
  • Inside Micrometer (with 6 pcs rods)
  • Combination Set
  • Full-Flexible Rule
  • Test Indicator Set, Range 0.04"
  • Dial Caliper, Range 0-6"
  • Dial Indicator, Range 1.0"
  • Magnetic Stand

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Phase Contrast Microscopy Camera Comparison

The images below of human cheek cells were captured using a phase contrast microscope with a 40x phase lens and two different microscopy cameras. If you are unsure what phase contrast is, you can read about the process here.

The MoticamX is a 1.3 megapixel WiFi microscope camera. This microscope camera creates its own wireless network and allows live images from the microscope to be both viewed and captured on a tablet, phone or computer. The MoticamX is typically used in schools and sometimes in industrial settings. One limitation to this wireless camera is that the tablet or phone must be within line of site of the camera (no walls between the devices) and within 20-30 feet of the camera.



Phase contrast image of cheek cells captured with MoticamX microscope WiFi camera.
MoticamX cheek cell image captured using phase contrast microscope at 400x.

MoticamX WiFi microscope camera image of phase contrast 400x cheek cells under the microscope.
MoticamX cheek cell image captured using phase contrast microscope at 400x.

Cheek cells under the microscope at 400x using phase contrast microscopy.
MoticamX cheek cell image captured using phase contrast microscope at 400x.

HD high definition microscopy camera.
The HDCAM4 is a high definition HD microscope camera. The camera provides a high live frame rate of 60 frames per second at full HD resolution. Images can be captured at 2 megapixels. Images can be captured to a SD card or the camera can be hooked into a USB port on the computer and captured through the computer. The HDCAM4 is used in both Universities and industrial settings. The high quality image and fast frame rate make it a solid all-around camera for a wide variety of uses.



Cheek cells under the microscope using phase contrast and an HD microscopy camera.
HDCAM4 cheek cell image captured using phase contrast microscope at 400x.

HD camera image of cheek cells under a phase contrast microscope.
HDCAM4 cheek cell image captured using phase contrast microscope at 400x.

Phase contrast microscope image of cheek cells captured at 400x by Microscope World using an HD microscope camera.
HDCAM4 cheek cell image captured using phase contrast microscope at 400x.

All images were captured using the exact same microscope setup: 
Contact Microscope World with questions about microscopy cameras, phase contrast or custom microscope solutions.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Human Cardiac Muscle under the Microscope

The cardiac muscle is an involuntary, striated muscle that is found in the myocardium, which is the muscle tissue of the heart and forms a thick middle layer between the outer epicardium layer and the inner endocardium layer.

Coordinated contractions of cardiac muscle cells in the heart pump blood out of the atria and ventricles to the blood vessels of the left/body/systemic and right/lungs/pulmonary circulatory systems. This complex mechanism illustrates systole of the heart.

Cardiac muscle cells, unlike most other tissues in the body, rely on an available blood and electrical supply to deliver oxygen and nutrients and remove waste products such as carbon dioxide. The coronary arteries help fulfill this function.

The images below were captured using a lab microscope and a high definition HD microscope camera.

Microcope World image of human cardiac muscle captured at 40x.
Human cardiac muscle captured under the microscope at 40x.

Microscope World image of human cardiac muscle captured at 100x under a lab microscope.
Human cardiac muscle captured under the microscope at 100x.

Microscope World image of a heart muscle captured at 400x magnification.
Human cardiac muscle captured under the microscope at 400x.

Contact Microscope World with microscopy related questions.

Monday, January 30, 2017

Tongue Taste Buds under the Microscope

A taste bud is a small organ located on the tongue in terrestrial vertebrates that functions in the perception of taste. In fish, taste buds occur on the lips, the flanks, and the caudal (tail) fins of some species and on the barbels of catfish.

Taste receptor cells, with which incoming chemicals from food and other sources interact, occur on the tongue in groups of 50-150. Each of these groups forms a taste bud, which is grouped together with other taste buds into taste papillae. The taste buds are embedded in the epithelium of the tongue and make contact with the outside environment through a taste pore. Slender processes (microvilli) extend from the outer ends of the receptor cells through the taste pore, where the processes are covered by the mucus that lines the oral cavity. At their inner ends the taste receptor cells synapse, or connect, with afferent sensory neurons, nerve cells that conduct information to the brain. Each receptor cell synapses with several afferent sensory neurons, and each afferent neuron branches to several taste papillae, where each branch makes contact with many receptor cells. The afferent sensory neurons occur in three different nerves running to the brain—the facial nerve, the glossopharyngeal nerve, and the vagus nerve. Taste receptor cells of vertebrates are continually renewed throughout the life of the organism.

On average, the human tongue has 2,000–8,000 taste buds, implying that there are hundreds of thousands of receptor cells. However, the number of taste buds varies widely. For example, per square centimeter on the tip of the tongue, some people may have only a few individual taste buds, whereas others may have more than one thousand; this variability contributes to differences in the taste sensations experienced by different people. Taste sensations produced within an individual taste bud also vary, since each taste bud typically contains receptor cells that respond to distinct chemical stimuli—as opposed to the same chemical stimulus. As a result, the sensation of different tastes (i.e., salty, sweet, sour, bitter, or umami) is diverse not only within a single taste bud but also throughout the surface of the tongue.

The taste receptor cells of other animals can often be characterized in ways similar to those of humans, because all animals have the same basic needs in selecting food. Carnivores and not humans have taste buds that are tuned for water. This taste sense is found at the tip of the tongue, which the part of the tongue for instance dogs curl to lap water. This area responds to water at all times but when the dog has eaten salty or sugary foods the sensitivity to the taste of water increases. The guess is that this ability to taste water evolved as a way for the body to keep internal fluids in balance after the animal has eaten things that will either result in more urine being passed, or will require more water to adequately process.

The images below are of a rabbit's taste buds and were captured by Microscope World using a clinical lab microscope and a high definition microscopy camera.

Microscopy image of rabbit taste buds captured by Microscope World at 40x.
Rabbit taste buds captured under a lab microscope at 40x.

Microscope World image of rabbit taste buds captured under the microscope at 100x magnification.
Rabbit taste buds captured under a lab microscope at 100x.

Microscopy image of rabbit taste buds at 400x captured by Microscope World.
Rabbit taste buds captured under a lab microscope at 400x.

Contact Microscope World with microscopy questions.