Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Polarizing Microscope Images

R40POL transmitted light polarizing microscope for viewing cross sections of rocks and minerals, petrology, and geology samples.
R40POL Polarizing Microscope
The images below are thin sections of rocks and minerals.  They were captured using the PAXcam2 microscope camera on the R40POL transmitted light polarizing microscope. The images appear different in some of the photos because the polarizer and analyzer were adjusted.

Polarizing microscopes are typically used in geology and petrology for viewing thin sections of rocks. Additionally, polarizing microscopes are often used in the pharmaceutical industry when viewing drugs and chemical compounds. Most drugs when viewed under the microscope create a beautiful array of colors.

2 Megapixel PAXcam2 microscope camera and PAXit! Software.
The PAXcam2 is a 2 megapixel color microscope camera with a CMOS chip in it. The images below were captured using the PAXit! Basic Measurement Software.



Polarizing microscope image captured with the PAXcam microscope camera and software.
Thin rock section under the R40POL polarizing microscope with PAXcam2 2mp microscope camera.

Microscopy polarizing microscope image under Fein Optic R40POL polarizing microscope.
Thin rock section under the R40POL polarizing microscope with PAXcam2 2mp microscope camera.

Polarizing microscope image captured with the PAXcam microscope camera and software.
Thin rock section under the R40POL polarizing microscope with PAXcam2 2mp microscope camera.

Microscopy polarizing microscope image under Fein Optic R40POL polarizing microscope.
Thin rock section under the R40POL polarizing microscope with PAXcam2 2mp microscope camera.

Polarizing microscope image captured with the PAXcam microscope camera and software.
Thin rock section under the R40POL polarizing microscope with PAXcam2 2mp microscope camera.

Polarizing microscope image captured with the PAXcam microscope camera and software.
Thin rock section under the R40POL polarizing microscope with PAXcam2 2mp microscope camera.

For more information about the R40POL polarizing microscope, PAXcam microscope cameras or any other microscope configuration, please contact Microscope World.

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Tongue Taste Buds Under the Microscope

Taste buds are small organs located on the tongue in terrestrial vertebrates that function in the perception of taste. In fish, taste buds occur on the lips, the flanks, and the caudal (tail) fins of some species and on the barbels of catfish.

Taste receptor cells occur in the tongue in groups of 50-150. They interact with incoming chemicals from food and other sources. Each of these groups forms a taste bud, which is grouped together with other taste buds into taste papillae. The taste buds are embedded in the epithelium of the tongue and make contact with the outside environment through a taste pore. Slender processes (microvilli) extend from the outer ends of the receptor cells through the taste pores, where the processes are covered by the mucus the lines the oral cavity. At their inner ends the taste receptor cells synapse, or connect, with afferent sensory neurons, which are nerve cells that conduct information to the brain. Each receptor cell synapses with several afferent sensory neurons and each afferent neuron branches to several taste papillae, which each branch makes contact with many receptor cells. The afferent sensory neurons occur in three different nerves running to the brain - the facial nerve, the glossopharyngeal nerve and the vagus nerve. Taste receptor cells of vertebrates are continually renewed throughout the life of the organism.

Microscopy image of taste buds captured at 40x using a digital student microscope.
Taste Buds under the U2D Digital Microscope at 40x.


On average, the human tongue has 2,000 - 8,000 taste buds, implying that there are hundreds of thousands of receptor cells. However, the number of taste buds varies widely. For example, per square centimeter on the tip of the tongue, some people may have only a few individual taste buds, whereas others may have more than one thousand. This variability contributes to differences in the taste sensations experienced by different people. Taste sensations produced within an individual taste bud also vary, since each taste bud typically contains receptor cells that respond to distinct chemical stimuli, as opposed to the same chemical stimulus. As a result, the sensation of different tastes (i.e. salty, sweet, sour, bitter, or umami) is diverse not only within a single taste bud, but also throughout the surface of the tongue.

Microscopy image of taste buds captured at 100x.
Taste Buds under the U2D Digital Microscope at 100x.


The taste receptor cells of other animals can often be characterized in ways similar to those of humans, because all animals have the same basic needs in selecting food.

Carnivores, but not humans, have taste buds that are tuned for water. This taste sense is found at the tip of the tongue for example dogs curl while lapping water. This area responds to water at all times but when the dog has eaten salty or sugary foods the sensitivity to the taste of water increases. The guess is that this ability to taste water evolved as a way for the body to keep internal fluids in balance after the animal has eaten things that will either result in more urine being passed, or will require more water to adequately process.

Microscope image of taste buds captured at 400x.
Taste Buds under the U2D Digital Microscope at 400x using a Plan Fluor Objective Lens.


The images shown on this page are taste buds from a rabbit and were captured using the U2D digital biological microscope.

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Why Use Microscope Immersion Oil?

When light passes from a material of one refractive index to another (for example: from glass to air), it bends. When using the 100x oil immersion objective without immersion oil, light is being lost when it passes from the glass slide, through the air, to the glass objective lens. In short, the light is bending, resulting in a microscopy image that is less crisp and clear than if immersion oil were being used with that same lens.

Take a look at the example below - these images were captured using the UX1 Achromat microscope 100x oil immersion lens. The first image was captured dry, the second using microscope immersion oil.

Microscope image of the duodenum captured with the 100x objective lens dry.
Duodenum captured using a 100x achromat oil lens dry (without immersion oil).

Duodenum under the microscope captured with a 100x objective lens using immersion oil.
Duodenum captured using a 100x achromat oil lens with immersion oil.

Visit this "Microscope Immersion Oil Explained" page to learn more about why, when and how to use immersion oil.

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

High Resolution Stereo Zoom HD Microscopes

Microscope World has several new high resolution stereo zoom microscopes that come equipped with a high definition HD camera and a 12" LCD HD monitor.

High definition digital stereo zoom microscope with LED illumination.
The FZ6ILST-HD stereo microscope provides magnification of 6.7x - 45x and bright LED top and bottom illumination. Magnification can be increased up to 180x with optional auxilary lenses and eyepieces. This microscope is perfect for industrial live work under the microscope because the camera provides 60 frames per second and full HD resolution.

The tablet LCD HD monitor connects directly to the HD camera and provides crisp and clear images without cluttering the work surface or desktop table.

Ball Bearing Boom Microscope with HD Digital Camera with a high frame rate.
The FZ6BB-HD stereo boom microscope is mounted on a ball bearing boom stand to provide easy access and room for larger objects. The viewing head of this microscope rotates and the ball bearing boom stand slides horizontally. Illumination options include LED ring lights or dual pipe lights. This stereo zoom microscope uses the same high definition HD camera and 12" HD LCD monitor. The camera provides a high frame rate of 60fps at full HD 1080p resolution. Optional auxiliary lenses and eyepieces can be used to increase or decrease magnification and working distance.

HD stereo zoom digital microscope with HD LCD monitor for industrial use.
The FZ6TS-HD digital stereo microscope is currently on sale and includes a 4-quadrant LED ring light for reducing glare when viewing reflective parts. The track stand has coarse focusing with smooth adjustment. The HD camera and 12" HD LCD monitor allows for live image viewing and image capture with an SD card. This HD microscope is best for small parts where no transmitted illumination is required. This microscope is available with click-stops if precise measurements need to be made.



Contact Microscope World with any questions about HD microscope cameras and HD monitors.

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Microscope Images from the Jenoptik Gryphax Arktur Camera

Jenoptik Gryphax Arktur microscope camera with 8 megapixels.
The Jenoptik Gryphax Arktur camera is a USB3.0 camera that uses a back illuminated sensor. This sensor allows light to be easily absorbed into the active layer of the senor and gives it a higher quantum efficiency. The Jenoptik Arktur 8 megapixel camera is a color microscopy camera created for research applications.

The image below is ginko that was captured using a 10x objective lens under a lab microscope with the Arktur camera. The image at the bottom of the page is the cross section of a pine needle with a 20x objective lens.

Ginko captured under the microscope using the Jenoptik Arktur 8 megapixel microscope camera.
Ginko captured at 100x with the Jenoptik Gryphax Arktur microscope camera.

Cross section of a pine needle captured at 200x using the Jenoptik Arktur 8 megapixel microscope camera.
Pine cross section captured at 200x using the Jenoptik Gryphax Arktur microscope camera.

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Lily Pollen under Microscope

This is an image of lily pollen captured under a biological microscope at 150x magnification. The images were captured by Harald K. Andersen in Steinberg, Norway. He captured 140 images in 2μm increments (manually) and then stacked the images together to create this beautiful 3D image.

Biology microscope image of lily pollen captured at 150x.
Lily pollen under the microscope courtesy of Harald K Andersen

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Fluorescence Microscopy Image from Infinity 3S-1UR Camera

Lumenera Infinity 3S-1UR microscopy camera ultra-sensitive 1.4mp USB3 camera with CCD sensor.
The Lumenera Infinity 3S-1UR microscopy camera is an ultra-sensitive camera that was designed to perform exceptionally in low-light conditions, which makes it perfect for fluorescence and NIR imaging applications. The high-speed USB 3.0 interface provides full resolution images a 60 frames per second.

The image below is a fluorescence image of a BPAE sample that was captured using the 40x objective lens and the Infinity 3S-1UR microscopy camera.

Microscopy image of BPAE captured using a 40x objective on a fluorescence microscope equipped with the Lumenera Infinity 3S-1UR camera.
Fluorescence microscope image of BPAE sample captured at 400x using Infinity 3S-1UR microscope camera.