Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Microscope Ergonomic Work Station

A proper ergonomic work station when using your microscope can reduce the risk of occupational injuries. UCLA Ergonomics suggests the following tips to maintain a safer environment when using microscopes:
  • Sit in the proper position keeping your back straight and your shoulders back. Distribute your body weight evenly on both hips, and keep your feet flat on the floor.
  • Arrange your work space so that it is close to you.
  • Ensure there is proper padding if leaning on hard surfaces.
  • Work with elbows in close proximity to the body.
  • Work with wrists in a straight and neutral position.
  • Adjust and/or elevate your chair, workbench, or microscope as needed to maintain an upright head position.
  • Adjust microscope eyepieces or mount the microscope on a 30° stand for easier viewing.
  • Repair and clean microscopes regularly. Learn how to clean lenses here.
  • If possible, spread microscope work throughout the day and between several people. 
  • Schedule works breaks. Every 15 minutes, close your eyes or focus on something in the distance. Every 30 minutes get up to stretch and move.
Microscopy is a demanding and rewarding field to work in. By maintaining an ergonomic work space you can ensure years of healthy and pain-free work.

Sources:
"Tips for Microscopy." Laboratory Ergonomics. Ergonomics.ucla.edu, 2012. Web. 27 June 2017.
"Posture for a Healthy Back." Articles. Health. Clevelandclinic.org, 2017. Web. 27 June 2017.

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Persimmon Endosperm

Endosperm is a tissue produced inside seeds following fertilization in most flowering plants. It surrounds the embryo and provides nutrition in the form of starch, though it can also contain oils and protein. This can make endosperm a good source of nutrition in the human diet. The image below is of a persimmon endosperm captured under the microscope using the Lumenera Infinty 2-1 color microscopy camera.

Persimmon endosperm captured under the microscope with Infinity 2-1 microscopy camera.
Persimmon Endosperm under the Microscope captured with Infinity 2-1 Camera

Contact Microscope World with questions regarding microscopes or microscopy cameras.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Microscope Magnification versus Resolution

In microscopy there are two concepts that many people often think of as a single concept, but they are very different. These two concepts are magnification and resolution. From a technical perspective, resolution is a quantified concept that is defined by the numerical aperture (NA) rating of the objective lenses of the microscope. Numerical Aperture is a number that expresses the ability of a lens to resolve fine detail in an object being observed. Magnification is simply how much an image is enlarged.

Below are two images of the same small printed part with text on it. The first image was captured using a stereo microscope with a lens that has NA of 0.10. This image was captured at 90x. Notice in the image below captured with the stereo microscope it is very hard to even read any of the printed text on the circuit. It should also be noted that it took nearly two hours to capture an image of this quality.

Image of a circuit captured under a stereo microscope at 90x magnification.
Stereo Microscope image captured at 90x, NA 0.10

The next image was captured using a metallurgical microscope with a lens that has NA of 0.30 and a magnification of 100x. This image took a few minutes to capture. The magnifications of the two captured images are similar however, notice how much easier it is to read the printed letters in the image that was captured with the metallurgical microscope. That ability is due to better resolution, which was obtained because of a higher numerical aperture of the lens used.

Metallurgical microscope image of a circuit captured at 100x magnification showing high quality resolution.
Metallurgical Microscope image captured at 100x, NA 0.30

Contact Microscope World with questions regarding NA, resolution, magnification or any other microscopy related questions.

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Corn Grain Under the Microscope

Corn is a large grain plant that was first domesticated by people in southern Mexico nearly 10,000 years ago. The ears of corn are actually fruit that produce the kernels (seeds) that people eat. Total production of corn worldwide surpasses that of wheat or rice. However, this is not all used for food. Corn is also used for producing ethanol, animal feed, corn starch and corn syrup.

The United states produced 361 million tons of corn in 2014, followed by China with 215 million tons and Brazil with 80 tons.

The images below of a cross section of kernel of corn were captured under the microscope using the Lumenera Infinity 3-3UR microscope camera.

Microscopy image of kernel of corn.
Grain of corn captured under the microscope with Infinity 3-3UR microscopy camera.

Microscope image of a kernel of corn.
Grain of corn captured under the microscope with Infinity 3-3UR microscopy camera.

Contact Microscope World for more information on Lumenera cameras or microscopes.

Friday, June 2, 2017

Middle School Microscopes

Microscope World offers several middle school microscopes that are perfect for kids exploring science!

MDS1 Middle School Microscope

Richter Optica MDS2 Middle School Microscope is a cordless and rechargeable microscope.
The Richter Optica MDS1 middle school microscope has several features that make it appealing to middle school classrooms and parents looking for a first microscope for their kids.
  • Cool, LED illumination (the bulb lasts a LONG time)
  • Carrying handle - perfect for younger students
  • Coarse & fine focusing, a must when viewing 400x
  • Cordless & Rechargeable - run the microscope corded or cordless
  • Retractable 40x lens helps teachers protect slides and the lens.

MDS2 Middle School Microscope

Richter Optica MDS2 Middle School Microscope has the ability to add a mechanical stage.
The Richter Optica MDS2 middle school microscope is a step up from the MDS1 in that it allows for the attachment of a mechanical stage. Here are a few features of the MDS2 middle school microscope. (Image shown includes optional mechanical stage).
  • Cool, LED illumination (the bulb lasts a LONG time) 
  • Coarse & fine focusing, a must when viewing 400x
  • Corded microscope
  •  Retractable 40x lens helps teachers protect slides and the lens.
  • Ability to add a mechanical stage, providing more precise control over X-Y movements of slides. 

 

MW2-HB4 Middle School Microscope

MW2-HB4 cordless middle school microscope from Microscope World.
The MW2-HB4 middle school microscope has a bit of a wider frame, providing added stability to the microscope.  A few features of this middle school microscope include the following:
  • Cool, LED illumination (the bulb lasts a LONG time) 
  • Coarse & fine focusing, a must when viewing 400x
  • Cordless & Rechargeable - run the microscope corded or cordless
  • Retractable 40x lens helps teachers protect slides and the lens.

Contact Microscope World with questions regarding middle school or student microscopes. 

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Motic Images Software Calibration Tutorial

Motic Images software is included with all Motic microscopy cameras. The software allows for image capture, annotation and one of the most commonly used features of the software: making measurements! However, before you can accurately make measurements with the Motic Images software, it is important to calibrate your microscope with the software first.

This video walks you through the steps of Motic Images microscopy software calibration.


Contact Microscope World with questions regarding Motic Images software or Motic microscope cameras.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Motic Panthera Microscopes

Microscope World is proud to carry the new line of Motic Panthera microscopes. Panthera is Motic's new upright microscope line. There are several Panthera microscopes available.

Motic Panthera S school microscope with fixed koehler illumination can run off a battery pack if needed.Panthera S School Microscopes

The Panthera S is a school model. This microscope has Plan SC Achromat objective lenses and an extremely efficient low power illumination that allows the microscope to run on a mobile battery pack for several hours. The Panthera S is a fixed Koehler LED microscope for the educational market and is available in both binocular and trinocular.




Motic Panthera U Microscope with LightTracer illumination feature.

Panthera U University Microscopes

The Panthera U microscopes were created for University use. The Motic Panthera U microscopes have Plan UC Achromat higher quality objective lenses than the Panthera S. The microscope has fixed Koehler 3W LED illumination, and a larger stage than the Panthera S model. The microscope features Motic LightTracer, a digital illumination control. The microscope has a digital intensity knob with coded LED nosepiece that controls the illuminator to offer information on the current light intensity of each objective. Once the microscope is calibrated for each objective lens, the user does not need to adjust the illumination intensity when changing the microscope magnification. The Panthera U is available in binocular or trinocular.

Motic Panthera C Classic Microscopes

Panthera C Classic Microscopes

The Moitc Panthera C microscopes were created for the traditional microscope user. This is a classic all-around microscope that provides both Halogen and LED full Koehler illumination with manual light management. The Panthera C has Plan UC Achromat objective lenses and this microscope includes an integrated USB camera power port (it does not include a camera) and an LED light intensity illumination indicator in the nosepiece. The Panthera C classic microscopes are available in binocular or trinocular.
Motic Panthera L Life Sciences Digital Microscope

Panthera L Life Sciences Digital Microscopes

The Panthera L Life Sciences digital microscopes have built-in digital capabilities. This microscope has Plan UC Achromat objective lenses and Halogen and LED full Koehler illumination. Motic LightTracer provides a digital intensity knob with coded LED nosepiece that controls the illuminator to offer information on the current light intensity of each objective. Once the microscope is calibrated for each objective lens, the user does not need to adjust the illumination intensity when changing the microscope magnification. Digital connection by HDMI, USB, WiFi or RJ-45 allows direct image projection to a monitor or the use of the Panthera App on a mobile device. The Panthera L microscope is available in only one binocular model with a built-in camera.

Motic Panthera HD Digital Microscope

Panthera HD Digital Microscope

The Motic Panthera HD Digital microscope has all the same features as the Panthera L, but it is meant to only be used as a digital microscope. The Panthera HD does not have any eyetubes or eyepieces.



Contact Microscope World with any questions regarding the Motic Panthera microscopes.